All In

Down here at Black Welsh Lamb we are relieved to have a barn full of hay to see us through the winter. Being grass-fed means that we have to rely more than most people on a good store, as we can’t fall back on cereal-based feeds if the hay runs out.

Haymaking; a hugely romantic, traditional aspect of farming is one of the most stressful times of the year for us.

2016 Hay

2016 Hay

Our participation in the Glas Tir environmental scheme means that we cannot cut grass until after the 15th July, which as any parent knows, is when school holidays start and good weather ends. Sometimes we can take advantage of young farmers’ need for cash the week before the Royal Welsh Show to get our permanent hay meadow contract mowed, turned and baled before the rain sets in. This year, however, the RWS dates meant that it didn’t happen, but neither did the rain and we finally cut in the first week of August.

It takes three or four days of decent sun to make really good hay and so the combination of good weather, perfect grass and decent availability of kit and labour is vital to getting things right. The idea of making good hay is that it bottles up sunshine to bring out in the winter. Any rain on it will grey out the sun and make the crop dull and lifeless.

2015_437

Plenty of grass at the moment

However, no matter how carefully you choose your week to make hay, there is an unwritten rule that the weather forecast will change about ten minutes after the grass is cut. We had a guaranteed week of sun this year, but as the mowers left, the clouds gathered and the threat of rain grew real. A few spots here and there, but the clouds subsided and we moved back into glorious sun. After a couple of sleepless nights, our beardy neighbour Tom rowed up and baled 350 bales of the best hay we have ever made. A few hours later we had it in the barn, where it rests, gently putting out a glorious hay smell and sitting ready for the winter to come.

2015_442

And the odd thistle

The sheep haven’t noticed yet, as we have plenty of nice late summer grass to concentrate on (and the odd thistle), but soon they will welcome it as a reminder of when days were long and and the sun shone bright.

For us, the hay is a passport to making sure we can offer the finest pasture-fed lamb and hogget for our loyal customers. Without it, life would be dull indeed. So here’s to a barn full of the finest and a successful winter ahead.

“There is no reason to fear the wind if your stack of hay is well tied” – Traditional Irish proverb

Our hoggets are available to order from the end of August. We supply whole of half sheep and the average weight is around 15-20Kg (including bones). We can deliver anywhere.

Drop us a line at baa@blackwelshlamb.com to enquire.

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About blackwelshlamb

Slow matured, organic, pasture fed Black Welsh Mountain lamb sustainably reared on a traditional farm in rural Monmouthshire. We sell to selected restaurants, shops and private clients.
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